Last edited by Bragor
Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

6 edition of Talking About God: Job 42:7-9 and the Nature of God in the Book of Job (Studies in Biblical Literature, Vol. 49) found in the catalog.

Talking About God: Job 42:7-9 and the Nature of God in the Book of Job (Studies in Biblical Literature, Vol. 49)

by Duck-Woo Nam

  • 315 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by Peter Lang Publishing .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Biblical studies, criticism & exegesis,
  • Old Testament,
  • Religion & Beliefs,
  • Christian Theology - General,
  • History,
  • Biblical Studies - Old Testament,
  • Religion,
  • Religion - Biblical Studies,
  • Bible,
  • Bible.,
  • Criticism, interpretation, etc,
  • Job,
  • Job XLII, 7-9,
  • O.T,
  • O.T.,
  • Theology

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages240
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL11397052M
    ISBN 100820461393
    ISBN 109780820461397

      Book of Job points to a patriarchal period. Archer and others see the Book of Job as the oldest book in the Bible (Gleason L. Archer, The Book of Job: God's Answer to the Problem of Undeserved Suffering [Grand Rapids: Baker, ), 16). Alternate views are given in Edouard Dhorme, A Commentary on the Book of Job (Nashville:   One of his great problems was the silence of God. Though Job cried in great distress, God seemed to say nothing to him until at last, God did speak to him out of a whirlwind, and examined Job's fitness to deal with him. Then, as you know, Job repented in dust and ashes. At the end of that time, in Verse 7 of Chap we read this account:

    Job's troubles. () Job expostulates with God. () He begs release. () Job here excuses what he could not justify, his desire of death. Observe man's present place: he is Book of Job Summary. Job is the bee's knees. Really. He's blameless and upright, and he has kids, a wife, land, and a bunch of sheep. Doesn't get much better than that. Up in the heavens, God brags to the divine assembly about Job. Lo and behold, Satan comes out and challenges God on Job's goodness. This can't end ://

    2 days ago  The Book of Job is one of the most problematic portions of the Bible and has called forth a variety of interpretations. A major difficulty in understanding the meaning of the book is, what insight leads Job to submit so humbly to God at the end. (It should be kept in mind that Job is not the author   The last of the book is a beautiful picture of what James calls the tender mercies of God toward Job (James ). God says to Job, "Now I want you to pray for your friends -- these three dear men, so stubborn, so sure that they had all the answers, so well meaning, so sincere, so dedicated, but such utter blunderers. Pray for them. Job."


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Talking About God: Job 42:7-9 and the Nature of God in the Book of Job (Studies in Biblical Literature, Vol. 49) by Duck-Woo Nam Download PDF EPUB FB2

By Michael Carasik, Published on 01/01/ Recommended Citation. Carasik, Michael, "Review of Duck-Woo Nam, Talking About God: Job and the Nature of God in the Book of Job" ().Departmental Papers (Jewish Studies).

"Talking about God is devoted to an elaboration of the nature of God in the Book of Job. By thoroughly examining the crucial problem of Job in which Job is commended and his friends (Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar) are rebuked for their talk of God, this book presents the main theme of the Book of Job as a unified whole and successfully investigates it from the theological perspectives   God rebukes Job's three friends and orders them to make a sacrifice.

Job prays for God's forgiveness of them and God accepts his prayer. At the end of the book, God gives Job twice as much wealth as he had before, along with seven sons and three daughters. After that, Job Rather, the reader is invited to ponder the pain and complaining of Job (Job19, ), the puzzling speeches of God (Job ), and the surprise conclusion of the whole story (Job 42).

Most people finish the book feeling unsure they got the point, but convinced they’ve experienced something :// 2 days ago  The book of Job begins with a prologue (Job ), which describes a wager between Satan and God, in which Satan (“the adversary”) bets God that Job–a particularly pious man–will abandon his piety and curse God if all his wealth and well-being are taken away.

At the end of the prologue, Job   In the book’s first cycle, Job’s friends’ speeches were halted by the revelation of God’s wisdom. The new element in the second cycle is that Elihu’s speech is interrupted by the dramatic appearance of God himself (Job ).

At last, God fulfills Job’s desire for a face-to-face ://   The Book of Job may be divided into two sections of prose narrative, consisting of a prologue (chapters 1–2) and an epilogue (chapter –17), and intervening poetic disputation (chapters 3–).

The prose narratives date to before the 6th century bce, and the poetry has been dated between the 6th and the 4th century bce.

Chapters 28 The point of the book of Job is to teach us that the mystery of evil is a mystery of a war-torn and unfathomably complex creation, not the mystery of God’s all-controlling will. Given how Christians are yet inclined to look for a divine reason behind catastrophes and personal tragedies, I think it’s a point   C.

JOB'S RESPONSE AND CONTRITION () 1. Job responds to God () a. He acknowledges the power of God, Whose purpose cannot be withheld b. He admits that he had spoken of things he did not know and understand 2.

Job humbles himself before God in repentance () a. In response to God's challenge to answer His questions, Job can only   God is, says the Psalmist, of “infinite understanding” (Psalm ) Nothing can be hidden from Him (Job ).

God also has foreknowledge, which is a concept with two aspects, prescience and preaquaintanceship. Prescience refers to God’s knowledge of events, situations, and persons in general, before they happen or come into ://   The upshot of the trial is that Job finally sees that God’s governance of the universe is much more wonderful than he could have imagined, and he openly concedes this (); so this is what Job spoke about God that was “right” ().

Now, it is absolutely crucial to note the sequence of events at this point: it is only when Job obeys   Job "I know that You can do all things and that no plan of Yours can be thwarted. Job After the LORD had spoken these words to Job, He said to Eliphaz the Temanite, "My wrath is kindled against you and your two friends.

For you have not spoken about Me accurately, as My servant Job   The book treats two major themes and many other minor ones, both in the narrative framework of the prologue (chapters 1 and 2), and epilogue ( to 17), and in the poetic account of Job’s torment that lies in between ().

Books/Job/Book of Verses God, having in the foregoing verses shown Job how unable he was to deal with the leviathan, here sets forth his own power in that massy mighty creature. Here is,I. God’s sovereign dominion and independency laid down, v.

That he is indebted to none of his :// The problem must be that Job is not pure and has not called on God as he should. So Bildad admonishes Job in –7: "If you will seek God and make supplication to the Almighty, if you are pure and upright, surely then he will rouse himself for you and reward you with a rightful habitation." Job Doesn't Surrender.

Job regards this party line 5. “Now My Eyes See You:” A New Vision of God. Job ends the book by worshipfully confessing that he has gained a whole new vision of God (), a vision so great that all his previous knowledge of God is like unreliable second-hand information by comparison.

Since Job is already exemplary in piety (), this is quite a statement. /five-truths-for-sufferers-from-the-book-of-job.

The glory of the story is that God Himself did prepare the very Mediator that Job requested, in the Incarnation of the Lord Jesus Christ (see notes on ). God appeared and engaged in His first interrogation of Job, who had raised some accusations against :// Books/Job/Job Chapter html. The Book of Job is a very difficult book to understand, and remember that Job never did receive an answer from God that we know of.

He didn’t understand why he suffered so much loss of life (his family) and health, and even his friends, so we may not understand what’s happening to us or why, but don’t ask “Why,” but rather “What Can you trust God is good.

Throughout the book, Job, his wife, and his friends speculate on why he, an upright man, is suffering. Job accuses God of being unjust and not operating the world according to principles of justice, and his friends believe that Job's sin caused his suffering.

Job decides to talk directly to :// Job – God Finally Speaks to Job Summary After being silent throughout the dialogues between Job and his friends, God finally speaks to Job out of the whirlwind.

God does not answer their questions about Job's guilt or innocence, but rather speaks about the created order and contrasts what God can do with what humans are able to do. Some people struggle with the book of Job because, when they look at the life of Jesus, they can’t find anything in the ministry of Jesus that corresponds to Job’s story.

They decide, therefore, that they can’t find Jesus in the book of Job. But I think they’ve stopped just short.

They should have gone a bit further and looked at His The lesson from the big book of Job is 1) that God is sovereign over all our suffering; 2) he permits Satan to come into our lives and do horrible things to us; 3) he means to prove our faith and purify our lives through it; 4) in the end he will make it good, either in this life or in the life to come; and 5) Satan does not have the last word The Lord Rebukes Job's Friends.

7 After the Lord had spoken these words to Job, the Lord said to Eliphaz the Temanite: “My anger burns against you and against your two friends, for you have not spoken of me what is right, as my servant Job has. 8 Now therefore take seven bulls and seven rams and go to my servant Job and offer up a burnt offering for ://?search=job+42&version=ESV.